Corner of Baltimore and Liberty Streets in 1914

Check out this great old postcard of Baltimore from 1914. It shows what was then called McLane Place, now the intersection of Baltimore and Liberty Streets. It was named for former mayor of Baltimore, Robert McLane. He was mayor during the Great Fire of 1904 and helped guide the city through those dark times of recovery.

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View of the corner of Baltimore and Liberty Streets. It was named McLane Place for Robert McClane, who was mayor of Baltimore at the time of great 1904 fire, and subsequently committed suicide. The name change did not last, and the location is now the crossing of Baltimore and Liberty Streets again. The monument to the left is that of John Mifflin Hood (1843-1906), a lieutenant in the Confederate Army, later president of Western Maryland Railroad (1874-1902). The sculpture was relocated to Preston Gardens in 1963. The store on the right is Baltimore Bargain House (later American Wholesale Corporation), a firm established by Jacob Epstein (1864-1945). Also in view is an early billboard advertisement boasting, "Pays to advertise with electric signs. Get yours now."
View of the corner of Baltimore and Liberty Streets. It was named McLane Place for Robert McClane, who was mayor of Baltimore at the time of great 1904 fire, and subsequently committed suicide. The name change did not last, and the location is now the crossing of Baltimore and Liberty Streets again. The monument to the left is that of John Mifflin Hood (1843-1906), a lieutenant in the Confederate Army, later president of Western Maryland Railroad (1874-1902). The sculpture was relocated to Preston Gardens in 1963. The store on the right is Baltimore Bargain House (later American Wholesale Corporation), a firm established by Jacob Epstein (1864-1945). Also in view is an early billboard advertisement boasting, “Pays to advertise with electric signs. Get yours now.”

Source: Digital Maryland

Take a look at what the corner looks like today on Google Maps.

The young mayor was just four months into helping the recovery effort when he committed suicide. The city lost a wonderful and vivacious leader, and his death was under very questionable circumstances. There’s an interesting article at the Baltimore Sun about this that you should read.

About Tom

Tom founded Ghosts of DC on January 4th, 2012 as a blog to uncover the lost and untold history of Washington, D.C. He has lived in the city for over a decade and loves exploring every corner of the District.

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