Baltimore history

The lost and untold history of Baltimore.

Two McNultys

Notable People & Places

Meet the Real Officer McNulty

Digging through The Baltimore Sun archives, we came across something awesome … another policeman named McNulty! Much like the famed Ghosts of DC hero, Officer Sprinkle, Officer McNulty was a local micro-celebrity. Unlike the alcoholic,...

Other Cool Stuff

Baltimore Street Parade in 1916

Here’s a photo from 1916, showing a parade down Baltimore St. from Holliday St. Source: Shorpy

Catonsville Junction, 1910. Rudolph Diehlmann poses before his lunchroom establishment. While crying out for some landscaping, the site's amenities include a pay phone. Tracks on the left are the Baltimore Traction Company's No. 14 streetcar line, pointing east toward Baltimore.

Other Cool Stuff

Rudolph Diehlmann’s Lunchroom in Catonsville

We looked up Diehlmann in the 1920 U.S. Census and it had him living on Smithwood Ave., probably near the today’s intersection with Edmondson Ave. Source: Ancestry.com

Catonsville home advertisement

Old Ads & Classifieds

Catonsville Home for $57 Monthly Payments

This is an ad that we dug up in The Baltimore Sun from January 7th, 1951.

Baltimore, Maryland, circa 1906. "Light Street looking north." 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company.

Faces & Places of Yesterday

Light Street in 1906

What an amazing view of Light St. This is from 1906. Source: Shorpy

Bernard J. "Boompy" Logue of 2527 E. Monument St. in Baltimore, MD, about 1920, on his home made bicycle.

Other Cool Stuff

Baltimore’s Homemade Bicycle Circa 1920

Now this is a resourceful young man. The young man is Bernard Logue of 2527 E. Monument St. It appears that the image below is similar to the Google Street View, but we can’t...

This double-ended, 1918 vintage Baltimore Traction Company Brill streetcar has just begun its in-bound journey from Ellicott City, Maryland, heading east to Baltimore on the No. 9 line. Positioned here at 8304 Main Street, car 5706 is about to plunge down a fairly steep grade (about 5%) that bottoms out at the Patapsco River crossing seen here. It must climb a longer but less arduous slope on the other side.

Featured, Other Cool Stuff

Ellicott City Trolley (1955)

Here are a couple cool old photos that we dug up on Shorpy. It’s a vintage 1910s streetcar running in 1955. Source: Shorpy Source: Shorpy

July 1909. Baltimore, Md. "One of the small boys in J.S. Farrand Packing Co. and a heavy load. J.W. Magruder, witness." Photo: Lewis Wickes Hine.

Featured, Other Cool Stuff

Wow. Amazing Photo of Barefoot Boy at Packing Plant

Whoa, this is an incredible old photo from 1909. Unfortunately, this is a nameless, shoeless boy. I wonder what ever became of this guy. Source: Shorpy

Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards, Baltimore. 1941. "Between the ways of this large Eastern shipyard run tracks for flatcars carrying materials or sections to be hoisted onto the deck of Liberty ships under construction."

Other Cool Stuff

Great Photo of Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards in 1941

Source: Shorpy This is a terrific old photo from just before World War II.

Bolton Hill row houses

Why Is It Named ... ?

Why Is It Named Bolton Hill?

Do you know why it’s called Bolton Hill? Before we did a little research, we sure didn’t. So, here it is. The area around Bolton Hill was originally owned by Baltimore merchant, George Grundy....

Frienship International Airport

Historical Trivia

What Was The First Flight to Land at Friendship (BWI) and Who Was the First Passenger?

Now this is some excellent trivia for you. The first flight to use the airport was Eastern Air Lines en route from Atlanta to Newark, landing just after midnight on July 24th. Source: Kilduffs...

Towson home advertisement

Old Ads & Classifieds

Towson Ranch Home for $19,800

Here’s an advertisement that we found in The Baltimore Sun, printed on January 7th, 1951. Source: Baltimore Sun

Catonsville, Maryland, C. 1915. These no-nonsense chaps manned streetcars for the Baltimore Traction company. In those days, two-man crews were the norm, with a motorman at the tiller and a conductor to collect tickets and to be the first line of customer service. The car's signage references Hillen, York, and Frederick Roads, all of which still exist today in the city of Baltimore. Without additional documentation, it's not clear exactly how a streetcar would traverse those as part of one route.

Catonsville Streetcar Men Circa 1915

Here’s an old photo of men that manned the Baltimore streetcars back around 1915.

Payday on the Baltimore Waterfront (1905)

This is an incredible photograph from 1905. It shows a group of men lining up for payday on the waterfront. Click on it for a larger image and take some time examining it. It’s...

Guest Posts

The Most Forgotten World Champion

Did you know that Baltimore was home to the “most forgotten” world wrestling champion?  August John “Americus” Schoenlein  was born December 25, 1883 in Baltimore and surprisingly made his professional debut in 1901, after...

Occident Federal advertisement - 1964

Old Ads & Classifieds

1964 Occident Federal Mortgage Advertisement

This is an advertisement for Occident Federal, printed in The Baltimore Sun on July 2nd, 1964. They were offering mortgages up to 80% of the property value and a maximum of 25 years. In the...

The Catonsville Junction was the terminus for the Baltimore Traction Company's streetcar lines 8, 9, and 14. On this 1950s summer day, a light grey over pencil-yellow Pullman-built PCC (Presidential Car Commission) streetcar departs southbound on the private, quarter mile right-of-way that emptied onto Frederick Road and continued eastward into the city of Baltimore. The little Belgian block gabled structure on the right is still there today, as are the houses in the center rear. The Amoco structure has been replaced by a modern Seven-Eleven convenience store.

Lost History

Catonsville Junction in the 1950s

This is an excellent old photo of Catonsville Junction, the terminus of the old Baltimore Traction Company’s streetcar lines. Source: Shorpy

Baltimore city directory - 1799

Featured, Other Cool Stuff

So Cool! 1799 City Directory for Baltimore

How cool is this? If you’re older than probably 30, you remember actually using a paper phonebook. Well, here’s a fascinating city directory that we dug up from 1799. It was printed by Warner...

Notable People & Places

Visit of President Polk to Baltimore

James K. Polk isn’t exactly the most memorable president. That said, this is an article that we dug up in the Baltimore Sun from June 21st, 1847. Polk was en route to visit Baltimore by...

Aliceanna St.

Bizarre Baltimore

Haunted House on Aliceanna Street

Here’s a tale of a real haunted house. We don’t normally write about real ghosts, just the metaphorical ones, but every now and then, we’ll come across something to share. This is an article,...