Baltimore history

The lost and untold history of Baltimore.

July 1909. Baltimore, Md. "One of the small boys in J.S. Farrand Packing Co. and a heavy load. J.W. Magruder, witness." Photo: Lewis Wickes Hine.

Other Cool Stuff

Wow. Amazing Photo of Barefoot Boy at Packing Plant

Whoa, this is an incredible old photo from 1909. Unfortunately, this is a nameless, shoeless boy. I wonder what ever became of this guy. Source: Shorpy

Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards, Baltimore. 1941. "Between the ways of this large Eastern shipyard run tracks for flatcars carrying materials or sections to be hoisted onto the deck of Liberty ships under construction."

Other Cool Stuff

Great Photo of Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards in 1941

Source: Shorpy This is a terrific old photo from just before World War II.

Bolton Hill row houses

Why Is It Named ... ?

Why Is It Named Bolton Hill?

Do you know why it’s called Bolton Hill? Before we did a little research, we sure didn’t. So, here it is. The area around Bolton Hill was originally owned by Baltimore merchant, George Grundy....

Frienship International Airport

Historical Trivia

What Was The First Flight to Land at Friendship (BWI) and Who Was the First Passenger?

Now this is some excellent trivia for you. The first flight to use the airport was Eastern Air Lines en route from Atlanta to Newark, landing just after midnight on July 24th. Source: Kilduffs...

Towson home advertisement

Old Ads & Classifieds

Towson Ranch Home for $19,800

Here’s an advertisement that we found in The Baltimore Sun, printed on January 7th, 1951. Source: Baltimore Sun

Catonsville, Maryland, C. 1915. These no-nonsense chaps manned streetcars for the Baltimore Traction company. In those days, two-man crews were the norm, with a motorman at the tiller and a conductor to collect tickets and to be the first line of customer service. The car's signage references Hillen, York, and Frederick Roads, all of which still exist today in the city of Baltimore. Without additional documentation, it's not clear exactly how a streetcar would traverse those as part of one route.

Catonsville Streetcar Men Circa 1915

Here’s an old photo of men that manned the Baltimore streetcars back around 1915.

Payday on the Baltimore Waterfront (1905)

This is an incredible photograph from 1905. It shows a group of men lining up for payday on the waterfront. Click on it for a larger image and take some time examining it. It’s...

Guest Posts

The Most Forgotten World Champion

Did you know that Baltimore was home to the “most forgotten” world wrestling champion?  August John “Americus” Schoenlein  was born December 25, 1883 in Baltimore and surprisingly made his professional debut in 1901, after...

Occident Federal advertisement - 1964

Old Ads & Classifieds

1964 Occident Federal Mortgage Advertisement

This is an advertisement for Occident Federal, printed in The Baltimore Sun on July 2nd, 1964. They were offering mortgages up to 80% of the property value and a maximum of 25 years. In the...

The Catonsville Junction was the terminus for the Baltimore Traction Company's streetcar lines 8, 9, and 14. On this 1950s summer day, a light grey over pencil-yellow Pullman-built PCC (Presidential Car Commission) streetcar departs southbound on the private, quarter mile right-of-way that emptied onto Frederick Road and continued eastward into the city of Baltimore. The little Belgian block gabled structure on the right is still there today, as are the houses in the center rear. The Amoco structure has been replaced by a modern Seven-Eleven convenience store.

Lost History

Catonsville Junction in the 1950s

This is an excellent old photo of Catonsville Junction, the terminus of the old Baltimore Traction Company’s streetcar lines. Source: Shorpy