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Baltimore in the 1840s

Monument commemorating the Battle of North Point, Calvert Street and Fayette Street, Baltimore, Maryland (1846)

Incredible 1846 Photo of Battle Monument

This fascinating old photo from 1846 shows the Battle Monument on North Calvert. It was taken by John Plumbe who also took this incredible photo of the White House, the earliest known photo of the President’s...

Travel Map of Baltimore in 1848

This is a travel map of Baltimore from 1848. Click on it for a larger version. Source: University of Texas Libraries

Baltimore Savings Institution Dollar Bill (1840)

Now this is pretty cool. We were trolling the Internet and came across this old $1 bill from the Baltimore Savings Institution.
Baltimore Sun advertisement

Slaves for Life and Good Titles

This is an advertisement from The Baltimore Sun printed on January 8th, 1844. It’s shocking, repulsive, and still unbelievable that we used to live as if this was acceptable in our country 150+ years ago.

Visit of President Polk to Baltimore

James K. Polk isn’t exactly the most memorable president. That said, this is an article that we dug up in the Baltimore Sun from June 21st, 1847. Polk was en route to visit Baltimore by train from...
Maryland Historical Society - April 4th, 1844

April 4th, 1844: Maryland Historical Society Meeting

The Maryland Historical Society is going to love this (BTW, we love them). We were digging through some really old issues of the Baltimore Sun and came across this small classified. This was the April 4th, 1844...
Baltimore Harbor view. Gay Street dock from Federal Hill, Baltimore. Attributed to Henry H. Clark. Full plate daguerreotype. Shows ships Herald and Juniata, Merchant's Exchange building (demolished ca. 1901-1902), and Second Reformed Church.

Baltimore Harbor View in the 1840s

This is what Baltimore’s harbor looked like in the 1840s. It’s a pretty amazing view. Source: Maryland Historical Society
shoe store advertisement

Cheapest Shoe Store in the City

Here’s another great advertisement that we dug up, this time from January 8th, 1844 in the Baltimore Sun. The shoe store was located at Eutaw and Lexington St.